Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Florence Day 3



By Justin Cruz

June 27, 2012

Florence day 3 kicked off like most of our days in Italy: With pastries. We went to the same cafe/restaraunt as we had on Day 1, the name of which I unfortunately cannot remember. This time though, rather than buying some pastries to eat at the restaraunt, we got a to go box and sat under the statues at Piazza della Signoria. It was some to go box, wrapped in red ribbons with all the food neatly organized on a little tray. We loved it. Plus, the pastries weren't bad either.


















From there, we took a short walk to the Ufizi, planning on using the day to make the most of the Florence Cards we purchased yesterday. It was an art lover's dream and a theologist's treasure box. Starting with the flat art of the Christian painters of the Middle Ages, the Ufizi had everything from the works of Antonio and Piero del Pollaiolo to Botticeli's Nascita di Venere. They had the original Battesimo di Cristo, the Verrocchio and da Vinci work that, in legend, made the former put down his paintbrush, never to pick it up again after having his work shamed by that of his apprentice. There was even a replica of the work of the man that started it all: Donatello's St. Mark.

By the end of it though, we were all hungry again, so we set off for Trattoria da I Matti. You'd think that after nearly two weeks of binge pizza devouring we'd be sick of the stuff, but no, it was the most popular dish on the table. The other stuff was good too, and I got to try something new (gnocchi - little balls of potato flour dough in pasta sauce), which is (almost) always fun.




















After lunch, we went to have a short visit at the Academia Gelleria, for more art. We didn't stay long though, as we only wanted to see the works of Michaelangelo. On the way in though, we did see the plaster composition of the Rape of Sabines. But the main attraction was in the next room, in which sat the legendary David, by Michaelangelo of course. The only other thing we saw was the gift shop, outside of which was a bright pink copy of the David.

Then we went home, but not after getting some gelato, as one would when in Italy.

4 comments:

  1. I learned a lot here. You've got me interested enough to find out more about these artists and works of art. The pictures are intriguing as well. Thank you!

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  2. Hi! Thank you for sharing your thoughts about Florence Italy tours. I am glad to stop by your site and know more about Florence Italy tours. Keep it up! This is a good read. You have such an interesting and informative page. I will be looking forward to visit your page again and for your other posts as well. Following the death of Lorenzo de' Medici in 1492, he was succeeded by his son Piero II. When the French king Charles VIII invaded northern Italy, Piero II chose to resist his army. But when he realized the size of the French army at the gates of Pisa, he had to accept the humiliating conditions of the French king. These made the Florentines rebel and they expelled Piero II. With his exile in 1494, the first period of Medici rule ended with the restoration of a republican government.
    Leaning Tower of Pisa excursions, as well as to Siena, San Gimignano, the Cinque Terre and much more with florence italy tours

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  3. Hello! Thank you for sharing your thoughts about Florence Italy Tour. I am glad to stop by your site and know more about Florence Italy Tour. Keep it up! This is a good read. You have such an interesting and informative page. I will be looking forward to visit your page again and for your other posts as well.
    During World War II the city experienced a year-long German occupation (1943–1944) and was declared an open city. The Allied soldiers who died driving the Germans from Tuscany are buried in cemeteries outside the city (Americans about nine kilometres south of the city, British and Commonwealth soldiers a few kilometres east of the centre on the right bank of the Arno). In 1944, the retreating Germans blew up the bridges along the Arno linking the district of Oltrarno to the rest of the city, making it difficult for the British troops to cross. However, at the last moment Charle Steinhauslin, at the time consulate of 26 countries in Florence, convinced the German general in Italy that the Ponte Vecchio was not to be blown up due to its historical value.
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